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Old 12-04-2012, 05:58 AM
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Default Whats your experience's with gps's??

I've been looking at buying a Delorme earthmate gps unit to take into the back country.i've currently got a Garmin rhino110 and its a piece of Sh*t.I'm sure if i fronted for the top rhino model it'd be better.my question is the delorme is cheaper and seams to come with some nice features.anyone use one? how do you like it? vs a rhino? thanks!!!~ Dan

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Old 12-04-2012, 07:23 AM
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Garmin is a much nicer unit than the Delormes IMO.

As a consumer product Garmin makes a killer lineup. I am use to the more high end GPS units such as trimble but it amazes me some of the files and how good they are in comparison to $5-10k units, it won't get you to submeter accuracy but for a navigational product it's tough to beat. The stock map sets they come with are getting better and better and there is less need for having to build your own base layers. I have used delorme before but the issue we kept getting was that they don't have a strong signal at times during the day usually around lunch (1100-1400), I don't know if it has problems picking up satelites or what but it would throw points all over on a map, I think for navigation you might be fine if you are moving a lot, but after seeing that first hand in open rangelands with no trees in the wideopen flats I would not trust it in canopy cover in the mountains (this was 3 years ago, not sure how much they changed their chip set).

As for the talking capability, I am really not sure but I buy a GPS to be a GPS and if it's going to be a walkie talkie buy it for that second. I would much rather carry a radio with me seperately that is a stronger source of signal, I want both and I want both to do their job well in case I really need them in an emergency. I guess I see the GPS side of the rhino as a better tool still over the radio side and I would base my purchasing off of that.
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:23 PM
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Like Rob said, Garmins are tough to beat for consumer-level receivers.

The radio in the Rino is a cool feature, and as a radio i've been pretty impressed with what it can do. It's not often you see two devices (GPS and radio) merged into one unit that does the functions of both units well. Garmin pulled it off with the Rinos. If you're shopping for a new radio anyways, might be worth looking at the better Rino models. If you already have a radio or prefer separate units (I'd rather have the radio on me, and GPS on the sled), go with a standalone GPS. Since you've got the 110 already, might be worth holding onto that and just using it as a radio and upgrading your GPS.

There's a ton of receivers out there with all kinds of different features... Make a list of what you want, what you can live without, and make a decision from there.
  • Color?
  • Turn-by-turn navigation?
  • Voice prompts vs. chirps/beeps/messages?
  • Waypoint/track log capability?
  • External storage?
  • Interfaces - Serial? USB? Wireless?
  • External power (This is big on moto/sled) - USB, or a bigger/more robust connector?
  • Waterproof, water resistant?
  • External antenna?
  • Hard buttons vs. touchscreen?
  • Price/budget?
  • Downloadable/upgradeable maps?
  • Aerial photos/raster image overlays?
  • ....
  • and on and on.
The 6_ series is the "handheld", "trail" models. Built for hiking, camping, etc.
The 7_ series are the marine receivers - they float, along with the same features the 6_ series has in terms of memory, processor, maps, etc. A 60 can use the marine maps, the 76's take CityNav/Topo maps.
60/76 are the older models, they've been superceded by the 62/78 series.

With the 60/76:
C = Color
S = Sensor package (Baro. pressure and electronic compass)
x = eXpandable memory. MicroSD card under the battery compartment.
Some of the older models (eTrex) has an "H" in the model for High-sensitivity receiver. All the newer models incorporate that chipset.

Personally I rock a 60CSx. If I had to buy a new one tomorrow, I'd consider a 76Cx or possibly the newer 78-series. Why the 76Cx?
  • Power connector: 60 and 76 both have the big, beefy 4-pin round connector. You're not relying on the small USB-MiniB for power, and the 4-pin can take 8-30 volts right off the sled/bike/truck's DC system. The USB connector will need to be regulated down to 5V. The 62-series receivers dropped this big 4-pin connector, leaving you with only the USB connector for external power.
  • No sensors. The baro sensor throws the elevation reading way off unless you calibrate it regularly. The compass is a real gimmicky feature - move 10 feet in a straight line and you'll get a more accurate heading. If you want a compass, buy a $10 one (you should have one of these, along with a paper map anyways).
  • Better RAM mount. The 60-series relies on the belt clip to secure the unit in the mount. It works well, but I've had it pop out on me before. The 76's mount wraps around the entire unit holding it more securely and giving it more protection.
  • Same maps I already have - US Topo and CityNavigator-NorthAmerica.
    • CityNav has -tons- of roads/trails, and it's routable (turn-by-turn guidance). Points-of-interest like restaurants, hotels, fuel are all in there and searchable.
    • Topo has topo lines - Only time I use this is snowmobiling. On the bike and in the truck, the lines add a lot of clutter to the display. Topo maps (the ones I have anyways) only include major roads, and they're not updated very often, nor are they routable.
    • Factor the cost of maps into your budget - There's free ones out there, but they can be hit-or-miss depending on your location and what kind of coverage you're after.
  • Expandable memory - Track points log to the data card as a backup. I can throw a -ton- of maps on there. I can back up GPS files from the computer onto it (turns the GPS into a flash drive).
Post up if you've got any specific questions or want pics/screenshots/further clarification ... between Rob and I, either/both of us should be able to answer just about any question you've got.
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Old 12-04-2012, 04:38 PM
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My setup on the bike:
Note the wrist strap looped around the handlebars "just in case" something like this happens.


External power comes from the side of the light controller, under the bars, and into the back of the receiver.


Same kinda deal on the sled, RAM ball mount, with a power connector on the dash.


Turn-by-turn guidance with CityNavigator maps loaded:


CityNav, Topo, Basemap.
Notice the coverage/naming of the streets with CityNav,
lack of street coverage/updates and topo lines on Topo,
and ... well, nothing on the basemap.
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Old 12-05-2012, 06:30 AM
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LOL i had a 60hcx that i had mounted on the bars of my Ski-doo Xp.....i rolled doin a sidehill and it snapped of and was lost to the GPS gods.I have a garmin etrex 30 i use for hunting.the problem i have with haveing a walkie and gps,or 110 and my gps is the battery life.With the colder temps they don't last.a few years ago we were in winter park and my sled broke down.i marked it on the rino and 2 upped out on the back of my buddies sled as it was getting dark.a storm rolled in and it started snowing like crazy.long story short us and 4 other guys got turned around once it got dark.4 of us had rino's and the batteries being new in the morning,they all started dieing when we needed them most.I thought i was going to spend the night on the mountain as the others in my group slowly started to panic.saying things like,"hey look over there that looks framiliar"lets go check that out....i'm a certified rescue diver and told them if we didn't bust out the compass and map from my pack and start thinking logically,they could drop me off at the nearest tree line and they could continue to do what they wanted.that being said,in my experiences the more battery operated devices the worse off i am.unless the higher end garmins are easier on batteries i wasn't impressed with the rino battery life.
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Old 12-05-2012, 08:30 AM
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Ram does have a full cradle mount for the 60 series GPS besides the belt clip. This mount has taken a lot of abuse and it works great,




As far as batteries, why not carry extras with ya? I usually have 6-8 fresh AA batteries with me, store them in ziplock bag in a dry location in my pack. I agree it's always good to have a compass and a map with ya, but if you haev working electronics AND especially know how to use them, i'll take my electronic advantage everyday.

And yes, lots of good maps out there for cheap or free these days, I have a etrex also for hunting but since I found a LOT of useful maps for my 62cs I have not touched it, I love the color screen and not having it be touch. Birdseye is pretty sweet, just wish I could hack the program and upload my own USGS data but they do an encryption to the files with the projection, I might have a way around it just haven't had a chance to experiment with it...

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Last edited by Rob1334; 12-05-2012 at 08:35 AM.
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Old 12-05-2012, 02:33 PM
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That's a 62, dude. :P
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:24 PM
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I have had the Garmin Rhino 530 HCX for two years. I sold it this Summer and purchased a Rhino 120 and the new Garmin Montana from BRP with the mounting system for the XM's. I feel I have the best of both worlds - the 120 I use to radio and locate my friends, and the Montana with the topographical is used for navigation. That big screen is nice to have!

As far as batteries go, do a search on the Sanyo/Panasonic Eneloop batteries. These are the best rechargeable batteries on the market, by a large margin. These batteries will change your mind about batteries.
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